Michael Mann

Michael
Mann

Distinguished Professor of Atmospheric Science,
Director of the Earth System Science Center

Expertise:

  • Earth Science

Focus Areas:

About

  • Among the most recognized climate scientists in the world as an expert on climate modeling and human-caused climate change.
  • The recipient of numerous awards and accolades including the Hans Oeschger Medal of the European Geosciences Union (EGU), the National Conservation Achievement Award of the National Wildlife Foundation, the Friend of the Planet Award from the National Center for Science Education (NCSE), and the Stephen H. Schneider Award for Outstanding Climate Science Communication.

Michael Mann is a Distinguished Professor of Atmospheric Science at Penn State, with joint appointments in the Department of Geosciences and the Earth and Environmental Systems Institute (EESI). He is also director of the Penn State Earth System Science Center (ESSC).

His current areas of research include reconstruction of past climate using climate paleoclimate “proxy” data and model/data comparisons aimed at understanding the long-term behavior of the climate system and its relationship with possible external (including anthropogenic) “forcings’’ of climate. Other areas of active research include simulation of climate using theoretical models, development of statistical methods for climate signal detection, and investigations of the response of geophysical and ecological systems to climate variability and climate change scenarios.

Mann was a Lead Author on the Observed Climate Variability and Change chapter of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Third Scientific Assessment Report in 2001 and was organizing committee chair for the National Academy of Sciences Frontiers of Science in 2003.

He has received many honors and awards including NOAA’s outstanding publication award in 2002 and selection by Scientific American as one of the fifty leading visionaries in science and technology in 2002. He contributed, with other IPCC authors, to the award of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. He was awarded the Hans Oeschger Medal of the European Geosciences Union in 2012, and was awarded the National Conservation Achievement Award for science by the National Wildlife Federation in 2013. He made Bloomberg News’ list of fifty most influential people in 2013. In 2014, he was named Highly Cited Researcher by the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) and received the Friend of the Planet Award from the National Center for Science Education. He received the Stephen H. Schneider Award for Outstanding Climate Science Communication from Climate One in 2017, the Award for Public Engagement with Science from the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2018 and the Climate Communication Prize from the American Geophysical Union in 2018. He is a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union, the American Meteorological Society, the Geological Society of America, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry. He is also a co-founder of the award-winning science website RealClimate.org.

Mann is the author of more than 200 peer-reviewed and edited publications, numerous op-eds and commentaries, and four books including: Dire Predictions: Understanding Climate Change; The Hockey Stick and the Climate Wars: Dispatches from the Front Lines; The Madhouse Effect: How Climate Change Denial is Threatening our Planet, Destroying Our Politics, and Driving Us Crazy; and The Tantrum that Saved the World.

He received his undergraduate degrees in physics and applied math from the University of California at Berkeley, an M.S. degree in physics from Yale University, and a Ph.D. in geology and geophysics from Yale University.

On the Web

Michael E. Mann's Personal Page Michael E. Mann is a Distinguished Professor of Atmospheric Science at Penn State, with joint appointments in the Department of Geosciences and the Earth and Environmental Systems Institute (EESI).

Faculty Profile Michael Evan Mann is an American climatologist and geophysicist, currently director of the Earth System Science Center at Pennsylvania State University, who has contributed to the scientific understanding of historic climate change based on temperature.

In The Media

"We've just lived through a summer - an unprecedented summer of weather extremes - droughts, wildfires, floods, superstorms. We are now seeing the impacts of climate change play out in real time. They're no longer subtle. And this report does a very good job in sort of putting meat on the bone - in providing the science behind what we can already see with our own two eyes - that dangerous climate change is already beginning to happen." - Michael Mann

How Climate Change Will Cause More Simultaneous Disasters

from The New York Times November 19, 2018

"Dr. Mann published a recent paper suggesting that climate change effects on the jet stream are contributing to a range of extreme summer weather events, such as heat waves in North America, Europe and Asia, wildfires in California and flooding in Japan. The new study, he said, dovetails with that research, and “is, if anything, overly conservative” — that is, it may underestimate the threats and costs associated with human-caused climate change."

How Amazon forest loss may affect water—and climate—far away

from National Geographic November 19, 2018

"Michael Mann, a climate scientist and director of the Earth System Science Center at Pennsylvania State University, called it 'another aggravating climate feedback' loop, where drying rainforest leads to less absorption of CO2, which in turn promotes more climate change, drying more forest. 'We depend quite a bit on the continued functioning of key carbon sinks,' he says. 'That’s just one of the many things that makes climate change a global problem.'"

Warmer oceans mean more moisture is available in a warmer atmosphere.

Hurricane Florence is a climate change triple threat

from The Guardian September 14, 2018

If we don’t act on climate change, the destruction potential of slow-moving storms such as Harvey and Florence will only get worse.

Earth Day and the Hockey Stick: A Singular Message

from Scientific American April 20, 2018

On the 20th anniversary of the graph that galvanized climate action, it is time to speak out boldly.

Doomsday scenarios are as harmful as climate change denial

from The Washington Post July 12, 2017

There is still time to avoid the worst outcomes, if we act boldly now, not out of fear, but out of confidence that the future is largely in our hands.

Yes — Donald Trump IS A Threat To The Planet

from Huffington Post October 3, 2016

In the current presidential contest, we could not have a more stark choice before us, between a candidate who rejects the overwhelming evidence that climate change is happening and a candidate who embraces the role of a price on carbon and incentives for renewable energy. If you care about the planet, the choice would seem clear.

Asset Downloads

These assets are available for use. All rights reserved. Credit Penn State University.

Michael Mann

Michael Mann


Credit: Penn State

Michael Mann, distinguished professor of atmospheric science at Penn State, and Bill Nye, a prominent science communicator, lead the March for Science last month in Washington, D.C.

Michael Mann, distinguished professor of atmospheric science at Penn State, and Bill Nye, a prominent science communicator, lead the March for Science last month in Washington, D.C.


Credit: Provided by Michael Mann

"The Tantrum that Saved the World" is a book co-authored by Penn State scientist Michael Mann and author/illustrator Megan Herbert. The book includes a story about how creatures and communities around the world are being affected by climate change, as well


Credit: Megan Herbert and Michael Mann

Michael Mann

Michael Mann


Credit: Penn State


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